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For Emily and other dictionarygeeks...… - Nate Bunnyfield [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Nate Bunnyfield

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[Sep. 16th, 2005|02:05 am]
Nate Bunnyfield
For Emily and other dictionarygeeks...

http://www.newyorker.com/talk/content/articles/050829ta_talk_alford




The same thing is done with maps. Fictional towns named after the mapmakers kids, &c.
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[User Picture]From: lazyman
2005-09-16 08:29 am (UTC)
I remember reading about the fake streets on maps in an old copy of Big Secrets. Sorta silly now, with modern technology.
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From: natebunnyfield
2005-09-16 08:30 am (UTC)
How so?
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[User Picture]From: lazyman
2005-09-16 09:09 am (UTC)
I would guess with map information that it's widely available enough that there would be little reason to try and duplicate someone else's database. Perhaps I'm wrong about that.
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From: natebunnyfield
2005-09-16 01:55 pm (UTC)
Well, data from government and international agencies (like place names from USGS or economic data from the UN) is widely available, even though the good stuff (1 meter satellite stuff the military uses) is not.

But to the point, the democratization of mapmaking means that you and I can make and sell maps, but the raw data we get from the US Census or the Argentinian goverment or whatever won't cut it. They only collect map data, they don't make road maps like AAA or McNally or anything.

In other words, the cheapest way to get cohesive map information (not map data) is from the mapmakers' map, after they invest tons into their own geodatabases.

And being it really is easiest to just trace somebody else's map. (That's what I and everyone else does. The rule that we're taught is that base data is okay (hydrography, place names, &c.), but really it's this huge contentious, gray area.) You end up with bogus traps in there. (Also mapmakers put there own name on mountains and things for fun and egotistical reasons.)




What is more interesting to me is the whole cartography (communicating relevant geoinformation) versus GIS (collecting precise geodata) thing. The whole "what is signal and what is noise" yadda yadda.
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